Social Studies

Social & Religious Studies Department

Overview
The Social and Religious Studies Department seeks to create leaders who are able to critically think, demonstrate empathy, and cultivate general intellectual curiosities about the world around them so they may become engaged, global citizens. We support excellence in education through a diverse, dynamic, and personalized academic environment that emphasizes engaged students and engaged learning. We educate students to embody holistic knowledge, inspire critical thinking, possess dynamic oral and written communications skills, and become global citizens. The meshing of these goals and ideals will equip students to make positive changes in the communities they live and serve in.

Social Studies

  • AP Government and Politics

    An alternative to Government and Open to seniors, students in this college-level one semester course taught in the fall will study concepts and theories that govern U.S. government and politics, understand typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences, and analyze and interpret basic data relevant to the American political system. Topics will include the constitutional underpinnings of our federal government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties, interest groups and the mass media, and civil rights and civil liberties. The course culminates in the nationally-administered AP Exam in May. Students who perform well on this exam may receive college credit and/or placement into advanced courses in college. This course is for the motivated historian who exhibits a passion for the subject area.  Placement is based on departmental approval.
  • AP Macroeconomics

    An alternative to Economics, this one semester spring course examines the United States economic system as a whole. The course places special emphasis on the study of national income, price level determination, economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. The goals for the class are four-fold: 1) To increase the students understanding of the American economic system output, unemployment and inflation. 2) To use graphic representation to explain economic events. 3) To apply monetary and fiscal policy to counteract economic problems. 4) To gain sufficient understanding, analytical skill and problem solving ability to pass the AP test for university credit. The course culminates in the nationally-administered AP Exam in May. Students who perform well on this exam may receive college credit and/or placement into advanced courses in college. This course is for the motivated historian who exhibits a passion for the subject area.  Placement is based on departmental approval.
  • AP Psychology

    Open to AP-eligible 11th & 12th graders, Full Year Course From the College Board: The AP Psychology course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. From the teacher: Students will learn through a variety of projects, discussions, individual exploration, and peer-learning. Be prepared for a high level of class participation.  This course is for the motivated historian who exhibits a passion for the subject area.  Placement is based on departmental approval.
  • AP U. S. History

    An alternative to regular U.S. History for juniors, this course requires motivation to do additional reading, analysis, and writing. It is a college-level course that uses college textbooks. In addition to a thematic development of United States history, students will be exposed to the different methodologies that historians use in order to practice their craft. There is a special emphasis on discussion and analysis. The course culminates in the nationally-administered AP Exam in May. Students who perform well on this exam may receive college credit and/or placement into advanced courses in college. This course is for the motivated historian who exhibits a passion for the subject area.  Placement is based on departmental approval.
  • Foundations of World Cultures

    This year long sixth-grade course seeks to educate and engage students as global citizens by examining the relationship between ancient history, geography, and religion. Students are introduced to the great early civilizations of the world and discover how these ancient cultures continue to influence the modern world. Honing in on their historical thinking skills, students begin to develop an understanding of the individuals and groups who have shaped significant historical and religious changes in our world. Research and writing skills are emphasized through the analysis of primary sources and the integration of project-based learning.
  • Government-Fall

    This course explores the structure and dynamics of American national government through watching and analyzing political films, providing an introduction to the ideas and institutions that shape politics in the contemporary United States. Students will examine how motion pictures create a window into political life to develop a deeper, more comprehensive understanding of the forces that shape American government and politics so that he or she may be both a more discerning student and critic of the system and a more informed and reflective participant in it.
  • Introduction to Business and Entrepreneurship - Spring

    This course is designed to introduce students to the world of business ownership and management. This course will build students' skills in the knowledge of types of business ownership, legal issues, accounting, business finance/start-up costs, business trends, site selection, marketing, pricing strategies and the development of a business plan on the students' product/service of choice. This hands-on course will involve students in a variety of activities that will provide them with the skills necessary to be successful in a constantly changing workplace.
  • Introduction to Business and Entrepreneurship -Fall

    This course is designed to introduce students to the world of business ownership and management. This course will build students' skills in the knowledge of types of business ownership, legal issues, accounting, business finance/start-up costs, business trends, site selection, marketing, pricing strategies and the development of a business plan on the students' product/service of choice. This hands-on course will involve students in a variety of activities that will provide them with the skills necessary to be successful in a constantly changing workplace.
  • Lessons in Leadership: Wisdom and Warnings from History - Fall

    When a crisis occurs, why are some leaders successful in navigating challenging waters and others plunge their nation deeper into disaster? What separates madness, delusion, and folly from wisdom, prudence, and courage? This class focuses on the decision making processes of various leaders throughout history. Times and situations change, but human nature has remained consistent. Using in depth case studies, the qualities and traits of leadership will be investigated, as well as the consequences for the people who follow. Students will gain insight into how some leaders were able to remain calm under pressure, overcome their egos and insecurities, and ultimately bring about greater good not only for their nation but for humanity. Conversely, students will also examine the process of corruption and how the delusion of individual leaders can bring about greater societal collapse. This course will ultimately use the cautionary and inspirational tales of history to equip students to become the leaders of tomorrow’s history. 
  • Lessons in Leadership: Wisdom and Warnings from History - Spring

    When a crisis occurs, why are some leaders successful in navigating challenging waters and others plunge their nation deeper into disaster? What separates madness, delusion, and folly from wisdom, prudence, and courage? This class focuses on the decision making processes of various leaders throughout history. Times and situations change, but human nature has remained consistent. Using in depth case studies, the qualities and traits of leadership will be investigated, as well as the consequences for the people who follow. Students will gain insight into how some leaders were able to remain calm under pressure, overcome their egos and insecurities, and ultimately bring about greater good not only for their nation but for humanity. Conversely, students will also examine the process of corruption and how the delusion of individual leaders can bring about greater societal collapse. This course will ultimately use the cautionary and inspirational tales of history to equip students to become the leaders of tomorrow’s history. 
  • Philosophy - Spring

    Plato’s famous “Allegory of the Cave” from the Republic describes something like a movie theater, with prisoners chained in an underground cave illuminated by a single torch. They can only see shadows projected on the cave wall, which they may mistake for reality and truth. Motion pictures serve as a valuable medium for exploring philosophical ideas and developing philosophical thinking, and this class will utilize films to introduce a variety of topics, including the philosophy of mind, truth, ethics, politics, and human flourishing. To supplement our viewing, Plato’s Republic serves as our primary roadmap for exploring key philosophical issues, supplemented with selections from other modern philosophical texts and contemporary social science.
  • Texas History - Fall

    Seventh-grade requirement, this is a one-semester basic survey course of early Texas history. Major topics include: native Texans, European exploration of Texas, missionaries, Spanish colonization and settlement, the struggle for independence, Texas as a republic, annexation into the United States, the Mexican War, and the emergence of the Texas cattle industry. Basic research and writing skills are emphasized.
  • Texas History - Spring

    Seventh-grade requirement, this is a one-semester basic survey course of early Texas history. Major topics include: native Texans, European exploration of Texas, missionaries, Spanish colonization and settlement, the struggle for independence, Texas as a republic, annexation into the United States, the Mexican War, and the emergence of the Texas cattle industry. Basic research and writing skills are emphasized.
  • Topics in US History: Economics of Public Issues - Fall

    Economics of public issues will focus on bringing economic policies to life.  It will inspire students how to think about public issues like an economist.  Most of the topics in this course will focus on the issues of our times.  The goal of the course will be for students to walk away with not only a firm understanding of economics but also the power of economics.
  • Topics in US History: Economics of Public Issues - Spring

    Economics of public issues will focus on bringing economic policies to life.  It will inspire students how to think about public issues like an economist.  Most of the topics in this course will focus on the issues of our times.  The goal of the course will be for students to walk away with not only a firm understanding of economics but also the power of economics.
  • Topics in US History: Herstory, Theirstory, Ourstory, History - Fall

    The main focus of this course will be women, minorities, and their societal advancement with an emphasis on American history. Discussion of the status of women and minorities from a more global perspective will occur. Women and minority studies examine the experiences and contributions of diverse groups of people and their often underrepresented effect on the course of world history. This course will discuss the difficult subject matter of topics like oppression, slavery, discrimination, and social marginalization. This content at times will be emotionally difficult to process and requires intellectual maturity on the part of the student. We will be using primary and secondary sources to investigate authentic experiences that will focus on multiple perspectives, as well as the nature of revisionism in history. It will also elaborate on their involvement in areas such as global social history, health, science, economics, war, human rights, and political activism. The course will also provide knowledge about gender and minority stereotypes, historic discrimination, oppression, and how this affects the course of human history. 
  • Topics in US History: Legends of the Old West - Fall

    This is a one semester class that focuses on the time period spanning post-civil war through the start of the 20th century in the traditional American west.  Examining the events and stories surrounding this pivotal era in American history are just as compelling and exciting when viewed through the lens of history as the myth and legend we have come to know in popular culture.  This class is designed to shed light on the truths about westward expansion, the American frontier and the legendary personalities that defined the period.

    To effectively examine this era, this class will use a variety of readings and imagery, comparisons between legend and reality, how the era is portrayed in popular culture, and the incredibly diverse group of outlaws, lawmen, cattle punchers, cowboys and adventurers that are sure to entertain and inform.
  • Topics in US History: Legends of the Old West - Spring

    This is a one semester class that focuses on the time period spanning post-civil war through the start of the 20th century in the traditional American west.  Examining the events and stories surrounding this pivotal era in American history are just as compelling and exciting when viewed through the lens of history as the myth and legend we have come to know in popular culture.  This class is designed to shed light on the truths about westward expansion, the American frontier and the legendary personalities that defined the period.

    To effectively examine this era, this class will use a variety of readings and imagery, comparisons between legend and reality, how the era is portrayed in popular culture, and the incredibly diverse group of outlaws, lawmen, cattle punchers, cowboys and adventurers that are sure to entertain and inform.
  • Topics in US History: Postwar America (1945-1975) - Fall

    This is a one semester class that focuses on this dramatic and transitional period that saw massive political, cultural, economic and social changes in the United States.  The class starts with the study of the Cold War during the period of the Second Red Scare and McCarthyism.  It examines the affluence and conformity of the Fifties while introducing the impact of the growing civil rights movement, the arrival of rock and roll music, and the creative energy of the Beat Movement.  The class then moves into an examination of the Sixties and looks at the social, cultural and political movements that served to define the decade, at the assassinations that derailed the hopefulness of those times, at the space race that took the United States to the moon, and at the war in Vietnam that exploded into the foreground and caused major divisions in the country.  And it concludes with the end to this era as marked by the Watergate Scandal, the American defeat in Vietnam, and the Baby Boomer generation drifting away from their quest for social and cultural change by becoming more concerned with career and family.

    To bring this era to life, the class will rely on a variety of readings, the music that served as the soundtrack of those postwar years, the movies that defined the era, and the booming television industry that brought entertainment, the social and cultural movements, and the war into everyone’s living room.
  • Topics in US History: Postwar America (1945-1975) - Spring

    This is a one semester class that focuses on this dramatic and transitional period that saw massive political, cultural, economic and social changes in the United States.  The class starts with the study of the Cold War during the period of the Second Red Scare and McCarthyism.  It examines the affluence and conformity of the Fifties while introducing the impact of the growing civil rights movement, the arrival of rock and roll music, and the creative energy of the Beat Movement.  The class then moves into an examination of the Sixties and looks at the social, cultural and political movements that served to define the decade, at the assassinations that derailed the hopefulness of those times, at the space race that took the United States to the moon, and at the war in Vietnam that exploded into the foreground and caused major divisions in the country.  And it concludes with the end to this era as marked by the Watergate Scandal, the American defeat in Vietnam, and the Baby Boomer generation drifting away from their quest for social and cultural change by becoming more concerned with career and family.

    To bring this era to life, the class will rely on a variety of readings, the music that served as the soundtrack of those postwar years, the movies that defined the era, and the booming television industry that brought entertainment, the social and cultural movements, and the war into everyone’s living room.
  • Topics in World History: Why War - Spring

    War is a recurring and ubiquitous human phenomenon that has existed throughout history. In order to understand why humans have been unable to coexist harmoniously, we will question what exactly war is and examine how warfare is practiced.  Why do societies resort to war over diplomacy? Blood, battles, and brutality historically have been romanticized throughout history, but how effective are military exploits at accomplishing goals? How and why do empires rise and fall?  This course will examine warfare in the ancient and modern world, requires student maturity due to the difficult nature of the topics, and emphasizes why war happens. To understand war, this course will use a cross-cultural approach to the study of war throughout history using both archaeological and textual sources. This class for is students in 10th  – 12th  grade, will have a heavy focus on battle simulations, historical gaming, and the methodology of all war.
  • U.S. Studies

    This year-long eighth-grade course is designed to provide the historical foundation essential for an understanding of the political, social, cultural, and geographical forces that shape modern society. The course begins with an examination of the historical origins of community, nation, and government and connects these roots to our modern democracy. A review of units on colonization, revolution, and independence is followed by a more detailed exploration of the founding of our nation, principles of the United States Constitution, western expansion, social reform movements, and the Civil War and Reconstruction. Skills for thinking, inquiry, and participation in a democratic society are emphasized.

Departments

Department Faculty

MISSION: TMI provides an exceptional education with values based on the teachings of Jesus Christ that challenge motivated students to develop their full potential in service and leadership.

NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATORY POLICY AS TO STUDENTS
TMI Episcopal admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin, sex, religion, and physical ability to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. The school does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin, sex, religion, and physical ability in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and financial aid programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.
TMI Episcopal
20955 W. Tejas Trail
San Antonio TX 78257
phone (210) 698-7171
fax (210) 698-0715