Academics

Humanities

Humanities Department

Humanities

  • AP European History

    An alternative to Modern World Civilizations and open to motivated 10th to 12th grade students, this two semester college-level course covers major events and trends from 1450 to the very recent past. Historical methodology and analysis are the cornerstones of this course; therefore, critical reading, discussion, and writing skills are vital to student success. The course culminates in the nationally-administered AP Exam in May. Students who perform well on this exam may receive college credit and/or placement into advanced courses in college. Departmental approval required.
  • AP Government and Politics

    An alternative to Government and Open to seniors, students in this college-level one semester course taught in the fall will study concepts and theories that govern U.S. government and politics, understand typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences, and analyze and interpret basic data relevant to the American political system. Topics will include the constitutional underpinnings of our federal government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties, interest groups and the mass media, and civil rights and civil liberties. The course culminates in the nationally-administered AP Exam in May. Students who perform well on this exam may receive college credit and/or placement into advanced courses in college. Departmental approval required.
  • AP Human Geography

    An alternative to regular Human Geography for ninth graders, this two semester course requires motivation to do additional reading, analysis, and writing. As prescribed by the AP College board, the course examines: Nature of and Perspectives on Geography, Population, Cultural Patterns and Processes, Political Organization of Space, Agricultural and Rural Land Use, Industrialization and Economic Development, Cities and Urban Land Use, and Human Environment. This is a college-level course that has a required college textbook. Assessments in this course will include AP multiple choice questions and AP essay writing. The course culminates in the nationally-administered AP Exam in May. Students who perform well on this exam may receive college credit and/or placement into advanced courses in college. Departmental approval required.
  • AP Macroeconomics

    An alternative to Economics, this one semester spring course examines the United States economic system as a whole. The course places special emphasis on the study of national income, price level determination, economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. The goals for the class are four-fold: 1) To increase the students understanding of the American economic system – output, unemployment and inflation. 2) To use graphic representation to explain economic events. 3) To apply monetary and fiscal policy to counteract economic problems. 4) To gain sufficient understanding, analytical skill and problem solving ability to pass the AP test for university credit. The course culminates in the nationally-administered AP Exam in May. Students who perform well on this exam may receive college credit and/or placement into advanced courses in college. Departmental approval required.
  • AP Psychology

    Open to AP-eligible 11th & 12th graders, Full Year Course From the College Board: The AP Psychology course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. From the teacher: Students will learn through a variety of projects, discussions, individual exploration, and peer-learning. Be prepared for a high level of class participation.
  • AP U. S. History

    An alternative to regular U.S. History for juniors, this course requires motivation to do additional reading, analysis, and writing. It is a college-level course that uses college textbooks. In addition to a thematic development of United States history, students will be exposed to the different methodologies that historians use in order to practice their craft. There is a special emphasis on discussion and analysis. The course culminates in the nationally-administered AP Exam in May. Students who perform well on this exam may receive college credit and/or placement into advanced courses in college. Departmental approval required.
  • Economics - Spring

    Economics is a one semester examination of fundamental economic concepts including consumer choice, market structure, personal finance, the roles of government, and development. In addition, supplementary materials will be introduced to dive deeper into a number of topics. Classes will vary from lectures to discussions and debates, and the course will include a number of economic projects which will help students critically examine economics on personal, national, and global levels. Course enrollment is limited to seniors. Qualified students may take AP Macro Economics as an alternative.
  • Foundations of U.S. Studies

    This year long eighth-grade course is designed to provide the historical foundation essential for an understanding of the political, social, cultural, and geographical forces that shape modern society. The course begins with an examination of the historical origins of community, nation and government and connects these roots to our modern republic using authentic resources. Units of study are designed around themes that focus on the values that define and strengthen our democracy. Students use the disciplinary lens of history and apply social studies knowledge to engage in meaningful civic engagement through service learning.
  • Foundations of World Cultures

    This year long sixth-grade course seeks to educate and engage students as global citizens by examining the relationship between ancient history, geography, and religion. Students are introduced to the great early civilizations of the world and discover how these ancient cultures continue to influence the modern world. Honing in on their historical thinking skills, students begin to develop an understanding of the individuals and groups who have shaped significant historical and religious changes in our world. Research and writing skills are emphasized through the analysis of primary sources and the integration of project-based learning.
  • Government-Fall

    This one-semester course taught in the fall focuses primarily on the Constitution and functions of government, exploring in some depth what the various articles of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the rest of the amendments actually entail. Topics include US political history from colonization through the Revolution to the present, 17th and 18th century political theory, the Articles of Confederation, the writing and ratification of the Constitution, major Supreme Court cases and historical and political analysis of each amendment. Course enrollment is limited to seniors. Qualified students may take AP Government as an alternative.
  • Human Geography

    This two semester course is required for ninth graders. It is an interdisciplinary examination of patterns and processes that have shaped our understanding, use, and alteration of the Earth. Human Geography allows students to better understand human issues in the geographical world. The students explore issues such as world population growth, international conflicts, political systems, and economic development. In addition, students are exposed to the spread of world religions and the origins and diffusion of languages. Students also study urban and rural development, industrialization, and city planning within a global perspective. During this course students will be introduced to the necessary digital media knowledge and skills for their Upper School Education. It will provide an introduction of basic digital media employed in an education context such as e-mail communication and word processing. This course will also introduce standards and practices for research-based work across all academic departments at TMI. Students will develop their web-based research skills to become effective discerners of online content. Qualified students may take AP Human Geography as an alternative.
  • Introduction to Spirituality - Q1

    This course is a 9 week introduction to the Spiritual Pillar at TMI. In middle school language, it deals with the human spiritual quest, and how people across cultures have found meaning and purpose in their lives. This course will address: How different religious founders have helped humans understand spiritual meaning and purpose in life, including Krishna and Buddha, Moses and Muhammad, Confucius and Lao Tse, and Jesus of Nazareth. During this exploration, students will do presentations on the spiritual history of their families, report on a local place of worship, and learn about spiritual practices such as prayer, meditation, and other mindful activities.
  • Introduction to the Biblical Story - Fall

    This course provides a broad overview of the basic stories, people, history, ideas, and values found in the Judeo-Christian Scriptures. It begins with an overview of the Biblical Story before Christ, including creation, the Hebrew patriarchs, the Exodus, and the history of the Jewish Kingdom and people. It continues by looking at the life and teachings of Jesus Christ, and how his message was carried forward by the early Christian Church. While this course teaches what is common to all Christian traditions, it also touches on how different Christian traditions emphasize different aspects of our Common Tradition, as well as noting the particular gifts of the Episcopal Church.  This course is one semester long, and open to Middle School students.
  • Modern World Civilizations

    Modern World History is a year long course that covers begins at the first Golden Age of Trade (1200) and continues to present day.  This course is a passport to ideas, innovations, wars, cultural experiences, adventures, failures, and triumphs that collectively tell the Human Story.  As students study each era, thematic connections to the modern world will be explored to better understand how our collective history continues to inform our present and helps to shape our future.  Reading, argument development, historical research, critical thinking and writing skills are heavily emphasized. Qualified students may take AP European History as an alternative.  
  • New Testament-Spring

    RELIGION | New Testament (1 Semester, Grades 9-12)
    The goal of this course is for students to gain basic mastery of the content, message, background, heritage, influence, and challenges of the New Testament, as well as other early Christian literature. Interpretive reading and memorization of key passages will be our foundational practice. Preparatory readings are assigned for each day and the instructor will model and guide interpretive oral reading, discussion, and writing in the classroom. Reading Guides will be provided for every reading assignment to support the comprehension and interpretive practice. Presentations will provide the needed literary, historical, and theological tools required for understanding the readings, and for building the intellectual habits and skills that form the student as a learner in the future. In-class discussions will wrestle with interpretive issues in further depth, and guide us in how Biblical ideas have shaped and been shaped by our culture. This course is one semester long, and open to Upper School students in grades 9-12.
  • Old Testament-Fall

    RELIGION | Old Testament (1 Semester, Grades 9-12)
    This course provides students with a basic mastery of the content, background, heritage, influence, and challenges of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible, as well as other ancient Jewish literature. Interpretive reading and memorization of key passages will be our foundational practice. Preparatory readings are assigned for each day and the instructor will model and guide interpretive oral reading, discussion, and writing in the classroom. Reading Guides will be provided for every reading assignment to support the comprehension and interpretive practice. Presentations will provide the needed literary, historical, and theological tools required for understanding the readings, and for building the intellectual habits and skills that form the student as a learner in the future. In-class discussions will wrestle with interpretive issues in further depth, and guide us in how Biblical ideas have shaped and been shaped by our culture. This course is one semester long, and open to Upper School students in grades 9-12.
  • Psychology: Mind/Body Connection

    Open to 11th & 12th Graders, Spring Semester In this one-semester course, students will gain an understanding of the brain, biological bases of behavior, states of consciousness, & social psychology. Students will learn through a variety of projects, discussions, individual exploration, and peer-learning. Be prepared for a high level of class participation. HISTORY | Psychology: Personality Open to 11th & 12th Graders, Fall Semester In this one-semester course, students will gain an understanding of major schools of psychological thought, personality psychology, personality and mood disorders, motivation and emotions, and an overview of therapy modalities. Students will learn through a variety of projects, discussions, individual exploration, and peer-learning. Be prepared for a high level of class participation. NOTE: Students wishing to take a full year of psychology may also register for the Psychology: Mind & Body Connection course.
  • Psychology: Personality

    Open to 11th & 12th Graders, Fall Semester
    In this one-semester course, students will gain an understanding of major schools of psychological thought, personality psychology, personality and mood disorders, motivation and emotions, and an overview of therapy modalities. Students will learn through a variety of projects, discussions, individual exploration, and peer-learning. Be prepared for a high level of class participation.

    NOTE: Students wishing to take a full year of psychology may also register for the Psychology: Mind & Body Connection course.
  • Religion in the United States - Spring

    Pre-Requisite: Student must have taken World Religions before taking this course.

    Course Description:
    Religion is contextual. How a religion is practiced, and who participates, is highly dependent upon where adherent live. As a society develops, it shapes the religions that function within it. Likewise, those religions shape the culture, ethics, politics, and values of the host society. In this course we will focus upon religion, imported and domestic, as it functions in the United States. The history of religion in the United States begins with what we call Native American/Indigenous religion and European Protestantism, but continues to diversify with the immigration of Roman Catholics, Jews, Buddhists, Hindus, and others whose religion originated elsewhere. It is from these more established traditions that specifically American forms derive, whether that be Episcopalianism, Mormonism, or Pentecostalism. Our study will investigate a wide-array of movements while focusing upon their protection under the First Amendment, and the challenges to that protection caused by harder to define new religious movements, such as Scientology or the Branch Davidians.
  • Texas History - Fall

    Seventh-grade requirement, this is a one-semester basic survey course of early Texas history. Major topics include: native Texans, European exploration of Texas, missionaries, Spanish colonization and settlement, the struggle for independence, Texas as a republic, annexation into the United States, the Mexican War, and the emergence of the Texas cattle industry. Basic research and writing skills are emphasized.
  • Texas History - Spring

    Seventh-grade requirement, this is a one-semester basic survey course of early Texas history. Major topics include: native Texans, European exploration of Texas, missionaries, Spanish colonization and settlement, the struggle for independence, Texas as a republic, annexation into the United States, the Mexican War, and the emergence of the Texas cattle industry. Basic research and writing skills are emphasized.
  • The God Debate: An Introduction to Philosophy - Fall

    Pre-Requisite: Open to students in 10-12th grade

    Course Description:
    This course offers an introduction to the discipline and main themes of philosophy through the question of "God" or "Ultimate Reality": Does God exist, and how does this affect our lives and our culture. In this course we will begin by exploring a "Philosophical Toolbox" which will introduce us to the main sub-disciplines of Philosophy, including Epistemology (what can we know and how), Logic (how to construct valid arguments), Ontology (what is the nature of being), Metaphysics (whether there is a "God" or Ultimate Reality, and what it is like), Ethics (how we ought to live), Aesthetics (the nature of beauty and art), and Teleology (the ultimate destiny of all things). We will then explore how these topics are pursued through the History of Philosophy, from the Ancient origins of Philosophy in sages such as Plato and Aristotle, as well as Indian traditions, to Medieval theologians such as Anselm and Aquinas, to Enlightenment greats such as Hume and Kant, to Modern thinkers such as Nietzsche and Keith Ward. We will end the class with a comprehensive structured debate about whether God exists, and if religion is good for society.
  • The God Debate: An Introduction to Philosophy - Spring

    Pre-Requisite: Open to students in 10-12th grade

    Course Description:
    This course offers an introduction to the discipline and main themes of philosophy through the question of "God" or "Ultimate Reality": Does God exist, and how does this affect our lives and our culture. In this course we will begin by exploring a "Philosophical Toolbox" which will introduce us to the main sub-disciplines of Philosophy, including Epistemology (what can we know and how), Logic (how to construct valid arguments), Ontology (what is the nature of being), Metaphysics (whether there is a "God" or Ultimate Reality, and what it is like), Ethics (how we ought to live), Aesthetics (the nature of beauty and art), and Teleology (the ultimate destiny of all things). We will then explore how these topics are pursued through the History of Philosophy, from the Ancient origins of Philosophy in sages such as Plato and Aristotle, as well as Indian traditions, to Medieval theologians such as Anselm and Aquinas, to Enlightenment greats such as Hume and Kant, to Modern thinkers such as Nietzsche and Keith Ward. We will end the class with a comprehensive structured debate about whether God exists, and if religion is good for society.
  • The History of World War II - The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly

    This one semester course examines the Interwar Years (1919-1939), the Second World War, and the start of the Cold War from the perspective of individuals to the standpoint of global powers.  While we will focus significantly on the American role, we will also examine the different experiences of each of the major belligerents. Whether covering the Versailles Treaty, the reasons for the rise of Adolf Hitler, American isolationism, military forces during the Great Depression, home fronts, the dropping of the atomic bombs, or the Holocaust, the students in the course will examine the social, political, cultural, and economic factors that contributed to how and why belligerents waged war, and, in turn, how war affected each of these factors across the globe. The course covers how and why the major belligerents planned and executed particular strategies and operations in the European and Pacific theaters to achieve their coalition and national goals.  In looking at the broader issues of the war, we will carefully consider the impact on the lives of individuals who experienced the associated consequences.  We will conclude with a study of how and why two of the members of the Allied alliance faced off in a new kind of war—the Cold War.  Throughout the course, we will consider how and why nations and cultures remember, interpret, and memorialize the events of this period (i.e., memory, myth, history, and imagination).
  • The History of World War II - The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly - Spring

    This one semester course examines the Interwar Years (1919-1939), the Second World War, and the start of the Cold War from the perspective of individuals to the standpoint of global powers.  While we will focus significantly on the American role, we will also examine the different experiences of each of the major belligerents. Whether covering the Versailles Treaty, the reasons for the rise of Adolf Hitler, American isolationism, military forces during the Great Depression, home fronts, the dropping of the atomic bombs, or the Holocaust, the students in the course will examine the social, political, cultural, and economic factors that contributed to how and why belligerents waged war, and, in turn, how war affected each of these factors across the globe. The course covers how and why the major belligerents planned and executed particular strategies and operations in the European and Pacific theaters to achieve their coalition and national goals.  In looking at the broader issues of the war, we will carefully consider the impact on the lives of individuals who experienced the associated consequences.  We will conclude with a study of how and why two of the members of the Allied alliance faced off in a new kind of war—the Cold War.  Throughout the course, we will consider how and why nations and cultures remember, interpret, and memorialize the events of this period (i.e., memory, myth, history, and imagination).
  • U. S. History

    This two semester survey course introduces eleventh-grade students to the political, economic, diplomatic, and social development of the United States. The two semesters will consist of thematic units such as identity, expansion, foreign affairs, immigration, civil rights, and politics over the course of American history from colonial times through to present day.  Students will work to draw lessons for life in modern America from the wealth of history the country has already undertaken. There is considerable emphasis on writing and research skills. Qualified students may take AP United States History as an alternative.
  • World Religion - Summer

    ELIGION | World Religion (1 Semester, Grades 9-12)
    The goal of this course is to deeply explore several of the Great Religious Traditions which have shaped human cultures and nourished the lives of countless persons across centuries of history. The main religious traditions that we will cover are Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese Religions, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and Secular traditions, as well as exploring some of the smaller religious movements. We will be guided in our study of these texts by our textbook, by hands-on class activities, presentations, discussions, and reading and interpreting sacred texts. We will examine both similarities and differences among these various religious traditions, as well as their ongoing influence in the world today. Our focus will be on gaining an accurate understanding and respectful appreciation of the basic beliefs and practices of the world’s major religions, and cultural fluency in other ways of life. This course is one semester long, and open to Upper School students in grades 9-12.
  • World Religion-Spring

    RELIGION | World Religion (1 Semester, Grades 9-12)
    The goal of this course is to deeply explore several of the Great Religious Traditions which have shaped human cultures and nourished the lives of countless persons across centuries of history. The main religious traditions that we will cover are Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese Religions, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and Secular traditions, as well as exploring some of the smaller religious movements. We will be guided in our study of these texts by our textbook, by hands-on class activities, presentations, discussions, and reading and interpreting sacred texts. We will examine both similarities and differences among these various religious traditions, as well as their ongoing influence in the world today. Our focus will be on gaining an accurate understanding and respectful appreciation of the basic beliefs and practices of the world’s major religions, and cultural fluency in other ways of life. This course is one semester long, and open to Upper School students in grades 9-12.
  • World Religions-Fall

    RELIGION | World Religion (1 Semester, Grades 9-12)
    The goal of this course is to deeply explore several of the Great Religious Traditions which have shaped human cultures and nourished the lives of countless persons across centuries of history. The main religious traditions that we will cover are Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese Religions, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and Secular traditions, as well as exploring some of the smaller religious movements. We will be guided in our study of these texts by our textbook, by hands-on class activities, presentations, discussions, and reading and interpreting sacred texts. We will examine both similarities and differences among these various religious traditions, as well as their ongoing influence in the world today. Our focus will be on gaining an accurate understanding and respectful appreciation of the basic beliefs and practices of the world’s major religions, and cultural fluency in other ways of life. This course is one semester long, and open to Upper School students in grades 9-12.
 

Department Faculty

MISSION: TMI provides an exceptional education with values based on the teachings of Jesus Christ that challenge motivated students to develop their full potential in service and leadership.

NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATORY POLICY AS TO STUDENTS
Texas Military Institute (dba TMI Episcopal) admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.
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